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EDITORIAL
Year : 2019  |  Volume : 10  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 1-5

Listen, care, and going extra mile: Guiding principles for physicians and teachers in health-care profession


Department of Medicine, Ross University School of Medicine, Miramar, Florida, USA

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Vijay Rajput
Ross University School of Medicine, 2300 S.W 145 Avenue, Suite 200, Miramar, Florida 33027
USA
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/INJMS.INJMS_33_18

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In the medical field, emphasis has been on the development of trust between the physician and the patient, similar to that of a teacher and learner. This is because a solid foundation of trust benefits patients' overall care and students' learning. Trust is critical because it allows the patient to believe that the doctor is there to give them the best care possible. Trust improves the physician–patient relationship because the patient believes he or she is receiving high-quality care as a result. It is important for residents and physicians to be aware of their behavior in their interactions with patients and learners, even if the interaction is only for a few minutes. This awareness is key for the development of trust and long-lasting benefits for clinical care and medical education. Physicians and teachers should develop three crucial skills to develop trust early with their patients and learners: (1) listening, (2) caring, and (3) going the extra mile for patients and learners. These attributes, when applied to patient care and teaching, will travel far in a physician's career and be beneficial to their patients' overall health. This article will explore these three skills and examples of their applications, which medical professionals can use in their day-to-day practice in light of a time-restricting, multitasking, and technologically advanced world.


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