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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2019  |  Volume : 10  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 89-94

Prevalence of intestinal parasites and risk factors with emphasis on Enterobius vermicularis in children of daycares and preparatory schools of the city of Khodabandeh, Northwestern Iran


1 Department of Medical Parasitology and Mycology, School of Medicine, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran
2 Department of Social Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran
3 Department of Medical Parasitology and Mycology, School of Medicine; Cellular and Molecular Research Center, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Mehrzad Saraei
Department of Medical Parasitology and Mycology, School of Medicine, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin
Iran
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/INJMS.INJMS_22_19

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Introduction: Intestinal parasitic infections (IPIs) are considered as a common cause of morbidity and mortality in children in the developing countries. The present study was aimed at examining the status of IPIs in the children of daycares and preparatory schools in the city of Khodabandeh located at Northwestern Iran. Materials and Methods: A total of 520 daycare and preprimary school-age children in the northwest of Iran were tested for the presence of intestinal parasites using direct smear and the standard formalin-ethyl acetate sedimentation techniques. Furthermore, the specific “scotch tape” test was used to identify the eggs of pinworm Enterobius vermicularis. Results: Of total 520 children, 55 cases (10.6%) were infected to intestinal parasites, including 9.2% monoparasitism and 1.4% double-parasitism. The prevalence rate for protozoan infections was 7.3% and 3.65% for helminths. Giardia lamblia infection was shown to have the highest prevalence rate among intestinal protozoa by 3.26%. The prevalence rate for E. vermicularis was 3.5% using “scotch tape” test and stool examination. There was a significant correlation between infection with intestinal parasites and daycares (P = 0.004). A significant inverse correlation was established between anal itching (as a sign of E. vermicularis infections) and hand-washing in children using soap or hand-washing liquid (P = 0.004). Conclusions: Infection with intestinal parasites in children of nursery schools and preschools of the study region, compared to the previous situation, is considerably decreased.


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